Meet Your May 2013 Breadline Feature: Julianna Buckmiller

1. Describe how poetry is poetry to you.

Poetry is a child of wax.

2. Describe how you are to you.

Awkwardness and a complete lack of hilarity. The child-like size of my feet and hands. Hyperactive synaptic firing. A pre-disposition for loneliness.

3. When someone says “The Merry Merry Month of May,” what exactly do you think about?

Someone that mixed up Christmas with Mother’s Day. This person is most likely a bad person.

4. Describe your childhood relationship with breakfast cereals.

Cavities.

5. Largest influences who may or may not be writers?

Jack Spicer, my third grade teacher that let me play with poetry magnets, John Ashbery, the poetry teacher that everyone hated freshman year of college, the sound of keys clicking, the blinding mockery of a blank page, the flaws in modern medicine, Allen Ginsberg, a premature interest in Human Psychology.

6. Your neighborhood in Seattle.

Capitol Hill.

7. Your location of childhood.

Everett, WA.

8. Your favorite space on Earth.

The space between my comforter and sheets.

9. Compose a line of poetry for this questionnaire.

The moment has vaporized, ensuring the closure of the data pool;
a torn moth’s wing.

10. Tell the world what it can expect from you at Breadline on May 15th.

Awkwardness pulling on your emotional shoe-strings. The premier of the “Emoji Poems” with Kristopher. A collection of short poems from my most recent manuscript that changes titles weekly, but is now working under the title “Sugar Teeth.” Hand-dancing. Shaky legs. Uncomfortable silence. Intangible vocabulary.

JuliannaBuckmiller

Julianna Buckmiller is a Seattle-based poet, photographer and painter. She is a recent graduate in Psychology from UW and is currently teaching kindergarten. She also does not know how to write bios and is less funny than the average person.

Meet Your May 2013 Breadline Feature: Kris Hall

1. Describe how poetry is poetry to you.

Poetry walks into a bar, orders a drink, and just never shuts up. It’ll tell you its life story, feed you an awkward line from a joke, laugh to itself, yell at you from across the room, punch you naked, steal a handful of your fries and make a remark about your wardrobe. Poetry will vomit in its mouth and kiss you on the cheek, following you home from a distance. But it’s okay, you and poetry are tight.

2. Describe how you are to you.

I am the reason I am always broke, coincidentally, usually drunk. I am not poetry, though… Just a fan.

3. When someone says “The Merry Merry Month of May,” what exactly do you think about?

Macy Gray and her appearance in Spider-Man.

4. Describe your childhood relationship with breakfast cereals.

I tested a box once. Pulled a foot-long hair out of my throat. NO-ONE APPROVED!

5. Largest influences who may or may not be writers?

Gregory Corso, Swamp Thing, boyhood trips to the welfare office.

6. Your neighborhood in Seattle.

Capitol Hill.

7. Your location of childhood.

Everett, WA

8. Your favorite space on Earth.

Google Maps. I can go anywhere.

9. Compose a line of poetry for this questionnaire.

Redact this verse due to squelch

to look at yourself in the morning.

10. Tell the world what it can expect from you at Breadline on May 15th.

Well, I’m big on playing the “awkward” card so that’s a guarantee. Julianna and I are sharing our most recent developments with the ‘emoji poems’. Poems written for a series of random emojis. I also plan on unleashing ‘The Rubaiyat of Ciao!’ – my (ridiculous) poetic epic about a red panda/snub-nosed monkey hybrid and his journey of self-discovery in a post-apocalyptic world. Expect screaming. Expect twitching. Expect everything except for everything that I just told you to expect.

kris

Kris Hall is a writer and curator for Da’daedal and Free Poetry from Seattle, WA. It could be much, much worse.

Meet Your Breadline Feature: Chris Dusterhoff

All answers were taken randomly from 1984 by George Orwell.

1. What was the first book you applied to your writing or creative process?

The strident voices stopped abruptly. The women studied him in hostile silence as he went past.

2. Tell me one thing you’ve cursed in your life as an artist.

The woman on the telescreen had started a new song. Her voice seemed to stick into his brain like jagged splinters of glass.

3. Tell me one thing you’ve blessed.

“For Hate Week. You know — the house-by-house fund. I’m treasurer for our block. We’re making an all-out effort — going to put on a tremendous show…”

4. Is April the cruelest? If not, please provide a replacement superlative.

Winston had stopped weeping, though the tears were still oozing out of his eyes. He looked up at O’Brien.

5. What is your spirit animal?

“Lackeys!” he said. “Now there’s a word I ain’t ‘eard since ever so long. Lackeys! That reg’lar takes me back, that does…”

6. Who is your spirit human?

The old man had on a decent dark suit and a black cloth cap pushed back from very white hair; his face was scarlet and his eyes were blue and full of tears. He reeked of gin.

7. Describe an experience with auto-correct on your phone or favorite search engine.

Anything could be true. The so-called laws of nature were nonsense. The law of gravity was nonsense. “If I wished,” O’Brien had said, “I could float off this floor like a soap bubble.”

8. What sponsor would you choose if you could have one?

A short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a “categorical pledge” were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984.

9. Have you ever played a timpani?

The next day she reappeared. Her arm was out of the sling and she had a band of sticking plaster round her wrist. The relief of seeing her was so great that he could not resist staring directly at her for several seconds.

10. Who’s got the last laugh?

“You are the dead,” repeated the iron voice.

Chris Dusterhoff was born and raised outside of Baltimore, MD. He moved to Seattle in 2000 and began publishing poetry. As Spankstra Press, he has published chapbooks by Maged Zaher, Brian McGuigan, Harvey Goldner, David LaTerre and others. On a personal note, an ex-girlfriend once told him he was just like Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights. He has since read the book and still doesn’t know if it was a compliment or not. But he guesses a modern-day Heathcliff wouldn’t, would he?

Meet Your Breadline Feature: Lou-Lou Hernandez

1. What was the first book you applied to your writing or creative process?

Are You My Mother?

2. Tell me one thing you’ve cursed in your life as an artist.

Crayons. Because of their melting properties.

3. Tell me one thing you’ve blessed.

Strangers, after they’ve sneezed.

4. Is April the cruelest? If not, please provide a replacement superlative.

April is the coolest month.

5. What is your spirit animal?

Ladybug

6. Who is your spirit human?

Don Ho

7. Describe an experience with auto-correct on your phone or favorite search engine.

“Ample ambling” auto-corrected to “ample cocking.” Or was it the other way around?

8. What sponsor would you choose if you could have one?

Plaid Pantry

9. Have you ever played a timpani?

No.

10. Who’s got the last laugh?

The laugh.

Hi. Lou-Lou Hernandez here. We are from Seattle. We record music, play shows. We like to play those shows with nice people, for nice people. We have a posse. We were the featured artist on KEXP 90.3 FM’s Sonarchy Radio in December 2013. We have some albums available, either at Wall of Sound (Seattle) or on demand, if interested. Our new cassette-only release (with digital download code) is called “Doors Opening, Doors Closing.” The album release party show will be on April 27 at Moon Temple in Wallingford. Here is a track from it.

Meet Your Breadline Feature: Michael Schein aka AB Bard

1. What was the first book you applied to your writing or creative process?

Gimor the Terrible Monster. Since renamed in my head: Gimor the Redundant Monster.

2. Tell me one thing you’ve cursed in your life as an artist.

New York.

3. Tell me one thing you’ve blessed.

LiTFUSE Poets’ Workshop.

4. Is April the cruelest? If not, please provide a replacement superlative.

Yes. The Civil War started and Lincoln was shot and we got into World War One, all in April. On the bright side, it’s my birthday! But enough about me . . .

5. What is your spirit animal?

Tardigrades, a polyextremophile commonly known as “Moss Piglets”. They can survive temperatures from just above absolute zero to over the boiling point of water, and pressures from the vacuum of space to the deepest ocean trench.

6. Who is your spirit human?

My wife, Carol.

7. Describe an experience with auto-correct on your phone or favorite search engine.

I don’t have a favorite search injun.

8. What sponsor would you choose if you could have one?

Any kind person who is rich and has few literary opinions.

9. Have you ever played a timpani?

No, I’m a djembe man.

10. Who’s got the last laugh?

Atheists. But it’s not really that funny.

Michael Schein is the author of at least two novels and a slew of poems.  His confirmed novels are Bones Beneath Our Feet (2011), and Just Deceits (2008).  Despite slanderous innuendo to the contrary, Michael allegorically decries authorship of The Killer Poet’s Guide to Immortality by “AB Bard” (2012).  Michael has taught poetry and fiction at a number of venues. He is a speaker for Humanities Washington and the Director of LiTFUSE Poets’ Workshop.  His poetry is supported by a grant from 4Culture; it has been nominated for the Pushcart twice, and stuck to refrigerators by magnets. 

Meet Your Breadline Feature: Brian McGuigan

1. What was the first book you applied to your writing or creative process?

Don’t know the first book, but ones I have come back to again and again recently are:

“Drown” by Junot Diaz
“Making Certain It Goes On” by Richard Hugo
“Wild” by Cheryl Strayed
And any of Nick Flynn’s memoirs

2. Tell me one thing you’ve cursed in your life as an artist.

Myself

3. Tell me one thing you’ve blessed.

I don’t believe in blessings.

4. Is April the cruelest? If not, please provide a replacement superlative.

The wettest.

5. What is your spirit animal?

A Mastiff

6. Who is your spirit human?

Coach Flowers from the “I Am a Champion” video. YouTube that shit.

7. Describe an experience with auto-correct on your phone or favorite search engine.

I just had one. I typed in “wettest” to be sure I was spelling it correctly, and Google’s auto-correct thing gave me “the wettest place on earth,” which had more than 1,200,000 results.

8. What sponsor would you choose if you could have one?

Jordan

9. Have you ever played a timpani?

I don’t even know what a timpani is, so I guess no.

10. Who’s got the last laugh?

Me always. I hate losing.

Born in Queens, NY, Brian McGuigan lives in Seattle where he is the program director at Hugo House and the co-founder and curator of the popular reading series, “Cheap Wine and Poetry” and “Cheap Beer and Prose.” Brian’s writing has appeared in Salon, The Stranger, City Arts, Seattle Magazine, Filter Literary Journal, and others. Spankstra Press published his chapbook of poetry, “More Than I Left Behind,” in 2006, and in 2010, he was shortlisted for The Stranger’s Genius Award in Literature. Currently, Brian is working on a memoir about his personal history with guns and the fear and paranoia that led him to become an unwilling gun owner, born from his recently published Salon essay about his childhood fantasies of mass murder. Brian is also working on a one-man show called “Fat Fuck” about his dramatic weight loss of 140 lbs. of which he has presented excerpts at Bumbershoot, Central Cinema and Annex Theater, among other venues, and received support from 4Culture and the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.